Termcard

Hilary term 2020

Term dates: Sunday 19 January to Saturday 14 March
Venue: Rothermere American Institute (unless otherwise indicated)

Daytime events are for Oxford academics, undergraduates, and graduate students unless otherwise indicated. Colleagues from other institutions and members of the public are welcome to attend RAI Special Seminars and Special Lectures, and Book Launches, which normally begin between 4pm and 6pm.

Hilary 2020 termcard (click to download)

 

1st Week

Monday

20 January

12:00-13:30

American History Graduate Seminar

Sage Goodwin (Univ)

Title to be confirmed

This seminar is convened by the graduate community in American History, meeting on Mondays in Seminar Room 1 at the RAI. Papers are normally pre-circulated on the Friday before the seminar, and the session itself takes the form of a Q&A. Please contact the convenor at ella.stgeorgecarey@history.ox.ac.uk for a copy of the relevant paper.

Tuesday

21 January

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering

Thursday

23 January

17:00-18:30

American Literature Research Seminar

Raphaël Lambert (Kansai University; RAI Visiting Research Fellow)

Book launch for Narrating the Slave Trade, Theorizing Community

(Brill, 2019)

Followed by a panel discussion featuring Tessa Roynon (RAI) and Kariann Yokota (University of Colorado Denver)

The ALRS provides a friendly and engaged forum for invited speakers to present their research. The seminar is followed by a dinner hosted by the convenors – a number of free spots at dinner are always available. Please email Daniel Abdalla (daniel.abdalla@wadham.ox.ac.uk) and/or Zachary Seager (zachary.seager@pmb.ox.ac.uk) to find out more, and to sign up to the mailing list.

2nd Week

Monday

27 January

12:00-13:30

American History Graduate Seminar

Peter Mancall and Adam Smith

Workshop: Getting a job

Tuesday

28 January

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

28 January

12:15-13:45

American History Research Seminar

Emma Hart (St Andrews), Peter Thompson (Oxford), and Grace Mallon (Univ)

Response to the Harmsworth Lecture in American History (Peter Mancall, ‘The origins of the American economy’, Michaelmas term 2019)

This paper will be pre-circulated: please contact the convenors at stephen.tuck@history.ox.ac.uk or gareth.davies@history.ox.ac.uk.

 A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Wednesday

29 January

15:00-16:00

American Politics Graduate Seminar

Christine Pelican (St Benet’s Hall)

Punitive rationales for bombing in the Vietnam War: the salience of deontological and consequentialist motives

The American Politics Graduate Seminar welcomes all to its regular meetings, which feature presentations and discussion led by postgraduate, junior, and senior researchers whose work relates to US politics. The seminar meets fortnightly on Wednesdays (Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8) from 3-4 pm at the RAI. Coffee, tea, and biscuits are provided. Please contact the convenor at mitchell.robertson@univ.ox.ac.uk for more details.

Wednesday

29 January

16:15-17:15

Oxford Early American Republic Seminar

Benjamin Schneider (Oxford)

Technological change and work: the transformation of American transport, 1750-1860

The Oxford Early American Republic Seminar facilitates a network for UK-based graduate students and early career scholars who study the United States between the Revolution and Reconstruction. All are welcome to attend. Many papers are pre-circulated: for details please email grace.mallon@univ.ox.ac.uk or stephen.symchych@sant.ox.ac.uk

This seminar series is supported by the RAI Academic Programme Fund.

Friday

31 January

17:00-18:30

RAI Open Friday

The Great Debate: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley and the Civil Rights Revolution

Nicolas Buccola (Linfield College)

On 18 February 1965, a packed Cambridge Union witnessed a televised debate between James Baldwin, the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, and William F. Buckley Jr., a fierce critic of the movement and America’s most influential conservative intellectual. The subject was “the American dream is at the expense of the American Negro”. Nicolas Buccola and Raphaël Lambert will revisit this historic occasion and discuss its continuing relevance to the persistent racial divide in the US, accompanied by screenings from the original debate. The event will introduce Buccola’s The Fire Is upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America (Princeton, 2019).

This event is open to the public.

To be followed by a wine reception.

3rd Week

Tuesday

4 February

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

4 February

12:15-13:45

American History Research Seminar

Romain Huret (EHESS, Paris)

St Valentine’s blues: never-married people, family values, and inequality in the 20th century United States

A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Thursday

6 February

17:00-18:30

American Literature Research Seminar

Erin Forbes (Bristol)

“Because the world does not exist”: Afrofuturism’s radical past

4th Week

Monday

10 February

12:00-13:30

American History Graduate Seminar

Ella St George Carey (Pembroke)

Very unorganized and uncertain? Nurse training facilities for Black women in 1920s New York

Tuesday

11 February

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

11 February

17:00-18:30

Winant Lecture in American Government

Margaret Weir (Brown University)

Race and the problem of the public in postwar America

This event is open to the public.

To be followed by a wine reception.

Wednesday

12 February

15:00-16:00

American Politics Graduate Seminar

Joshua Goldstein (St Hilda’s)

Does U.S. public opinion follow the leader or follow the crowd? Evidence from experimental surveys involving cyber-attack vignettes

Wednesday

12 February

16:15-17:15

Oxford Early American Republic Seminar

Kariann Yokota (University of Colorado)

Title to be confirmed

5th Week

Monday

17 February

12:00-13:30

American History Graduate Seminar

Noah Remnick (Balliol)

The history of school policing and discipline

Tuesday

18 February

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

18 February

12:15-13:45

American History Research Seminar

Heather Ann Thompson (Michigan)

Lore and logics: the liberal state, the carceral state, and the limits of justice and inequality in postwar America

This paper will be pre-circulated: please contact the convenors at stephen.tuck@history.ox.ac.uk or gareth.davies@history.ox.ac.uk.

A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Thursday

20 February

17:00-18:30

American Literature Research Seminar

Michael McCluskey (Boston)

Melting-pot media: ‘Americanization’ in the early twentieth century

6th Week

Monday

24 February

12:00-13:30

American History Graduate Seminar

Katherine Paugh (Oxford)

Workshop: How to write a book proposal

Tuesday

25 February

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

25 February

12:15-13:45

American History Research Seminar

Margaret Weir (Brown University)

‘Beyond the plant gates’: postwar labor and the organizational substructure of liberalism

This paper will be pre-circulated: please contact the convenors at stephen.tuck@history.ox.ac.uk or gareth.davies@history.ox.ac.uk.

A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Wednesday

26 February

15:00-16:00

Special Seminar

Lawrence Jacobs (Minnesota; All Souls College)

The form of American democracy: Jefferson, Jackson, and political party nomination

This event is open to the public.

Wednesday

26 February

16:15-17:15

Oxford Early American Republic Seminar

Nicholas Cole (Oxford)

Impeachment at the founding

7th Week

Monday

2 March

12:00-14:00

American History Graduate Seminar

Neil Suchak (Kellogg)

Transfer of Status presentation

Tuesday

3 March

11:00-11:30

Red, White, and Brew

Join RAI Director Adam Smith and colleagues for coffee and conversation at this informal weekly gathering.

Tuesday

3 March

12:15-13:45

American History Research Seminar

Sarah Pearsall (Cambridge)

A nameless woman in early America

A sandwich lunch will be provided.

Wednesday

4 March

17:00-18:30

Book Club

Come along to the RAI American Fiction Book Club, where we will be discussing Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth.  RAI Fellows from different disciplines will lead the discussion, and suggestions for future books will be encouraged.  Drinks and nibbles will be provided.

This event is open to the public.

Thursday

5 March

17:00-18:00

American Literature Research Seminar

Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest; Puerto Rico)

The limits of transnational exceptionalism: the case of Ernest Hemingway in Cuba

Friday

6 March

17:00-18:30

Book Launch

Peter Mancall (RAI Harmsworth Professor)

The Trials of Thomas Morton

Responses from Peter Thompson (Oxford) and Emma Hart (Cambridge) 

This event is open to the public.

To be followed by a wine reception.

8th Week

Monday

9 March

12:00-14:00

American History Graduate Seminar

Grace Mallon (Univ)

Forts, firearms, and federalism: Military preparedness in the United States from the Washington administration to the War of 1812

Tuesday

10 March

09:30-14:00

Congress to Campus

Two former Members of Congress visit the RAI to share their experiences with sixth-form students. This is a pre-registered event for schools, and is now fully booked.

Wednesday

11 March

15:00-16:00

American Politics Graduate Seminar

Alexis Ciambotti (Lady Margaret Hall)

The role of umbrella organizations in cross-sector relations: ACVAFS and public-voluntary sector coordination in the Refugee Act of 1980

Wednesday

11 March

16:15-17:15

Oxford Early American Republic Seminar

Lawrence Hatter (Washington State)

The past isn’t past: an indigenous history of the US-Canadian border

List of site pages