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The Last Best Hope? Understanding America from the Outside In

 

The RAI's podcast hosts experts carrying out world-leading research within and beyond the Institute – from D.Phil. students to visiting professors – to discuss both topical and universal questions about the United States. It asks what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed, and what that might be in the future.

The Last Best Hope? Understanding America from the Outside In is available on all podcasting platforms (including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify,  Soundcloud, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Podcast Addict, Podchaser, Deezer, Listen Notes, Tune In).

You can also follow the podcast on Twitter for regular updates on new episodes: @TLBHpodcast

The title comes from Abraham Lincoln’s second annual message to Congress, delivered on 1 December 1862, one month before the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation:

"In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free – honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth."

 


Episodes (Series 2)

 

General Harrison's Log Cabin March

The Harmonious Episode
23 October 2020

We can't imagine a political campaign without music – whether it's an election rally, a protest movement or a TV ad, music is essential. In this episode, Adam talks to Billy Coleman, author of a recent book about music and politics in the nineteenth century United States and asks him what music brings to politics and what we can learn from it about how politics works.

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 

Cotton pickers, Houston, 1913

The "Did the South Win the Civil War After All" Episode
14 October 2020

In this episode Adam talks to Heather Cox Richardson about how the values the South fought for – oligarchy, and racial and gender inequality – outlived the Confederacy. Heather argues that American history can be understood as a conflict between oligarchs and masses. Adam asks her why that is. How does a "democracy" become an oligarchy? And is the politics of today an echo of the politics of 150 years ago?

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 


Episodes (Series 1)

 

Lincoln, 1863

The Last Best Hope Episode
21 June 2020

"We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth" – Abraham Lincoln's phrase in his message to Congress in December 1862. What did he mean? In this episode, Adam talks to Rachel Shelden of the Richards Civil War Era Center at Penn State. They discuss Lincoln, his opposition to slavery, his vastly more complex view of racial equality… and why he coined that memorable phrase. If Lincoln thought America had a "mission", the Last Best Hope? podcast has a mission too: to understand why people thought, and many still think, that America has a mission.

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 

from William Gropper, Construction of a Dam (1939)

The New Deal Episode
2 June 2020

Does America - and the world - need a new New Deal? If so, what lessons can we learn from how old orthodoxies in economic policy-making were challenged in the interwar period? In this episode, Adam talks to Eric Rauchway about the year 1933, when Franklin D. Roosevelt came into office and immediately set a course that challenged some of the sacred shibboleths of economic policy-making.

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 

Gadsden flag

The "Don't Tread on Me" Episode
8 May 2020

Is a country that's had a successful revolution doomed to endlessly re-enact it? In this episode, Adam talks to Professor Margaret Weir (Brown University and Oxford) about why anti-lockdown protests take the form they do in America: armed men entering legislatures and the waving of flags with the slogan "Don't Tread on Me".

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 

Trump coronavirus update briefing (April 2020)

The Federalism Episode
2 May 2020

Dividing power between the Federal government and the states may have seemed a good idea in theory to the founding fathers but in practice it's led to confusion and conflict. Donald Trump claims that his power is "total". State governors – and constitutional experts – beg to differ. In this episode, Adam talks to Grace Mallon of Oxford University, an expert in the reality of Federal-state relations in the early republic who tells us that's it's always been like this.

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.

 

Baltimore riot (1861)

The Crisis Episode
2 May 2020

What is the difference between a "crisis" and a "not-crisis"? How do crises happen and how have they shaped history? Adam talks to Jay Sexton of the University of Missouri, author of A Nation Shaped by Crisis: A New American History, who thinks we're now in a crisis that, unlike previous crises, will leave the United States weaker.

Download this episode here.
View a transcript here.